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Repair & Maintenance Log

11/04/16: Acquired game.

11/20/16: New instruction and pricing cards. Installed standard-keyed (751) lock on coin door. Replaced existing Super-Bands with conventional red flipper rubber. Technically I should replace the yellow flipper bats with white. But I kinda like how the yellow goes with the other playfield colors.

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New cards and flipper rubber.

11/20/16: The M and N stationary targets had been reversed (e.g. hitting M would lite N and vice versa). I was warming up the soldering iron before it occurred to me that I only had to swap the targets back to their proper positions.

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M and N targets were reversed.

11/27/16: New legs.

11/27/16: Replaced Gold/Silver stationary target. The old target was round with damaged edges. The game flyer shows a rectangular target. I couldn't find any reference to the part number shown in the manual (D-11584-1). So I ordered something similar looking from Marco. What I got was a little too wide to fit through the playfield opening. Fortunately the target was disassembled and went together with screws instead of rivets. I installed the target blade from the top and assembled the rest of the target components in place. It was tedious, but possible.

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New target assembled in place.

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Old round target and new rectangular target.

12/16: Retrofitting a rotary beacon topper. According to IPDB, export Millionaires were equipped with a rotary beacon topper similar to High Speed or F-14 Tomcat. I have not seen any explanation as to why this feature was not included on domestic games. In fact I never was able to find any technical information regarding the export Millionaire beacon. This project was based on educated guesses I made by studying High Speed and F-14 pictures and schematics.

My only hardware hint to the beacon's existence was a connector and some pre-punched holes in the backbox. But my first step was to determine if my domestic game even had the supporting software. The domestic manual shows a blank space on the solenoid driver table at function 10 (transistor Q9). But "ROTARY BEACON" is displayed for function 10 during the solenoid driver test. So I rigged a temporary test lamp to function 10 and confirmed that the output is driven at various times during game play. Millionaire does not appear to have any game adjustments related to the beacon whereas both High Speed and F-14 have beacon game adjustments.

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My "REV 3" ROMs include supporting software for the rotary beacon topper.

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Five pre-punched holes in the backbox and a four-pin connector located between the sound board and the power supply board.

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The existing four-pin connector.

Based on the arrangement of the pre-punched holes and the four-pin corrector I guessed that the export's electrical arrangement was similar to F-14. The lower four holes are for a relay board and the top hole is for a fuse holder. Two of the connector wires (wht/blu) supply 24 vac from the transformer, one wire (red) supplies +34v solenoid power and the fourth wire (brn/red) is the control wire from function 10 (transistor Q9). I guessed that physical arrangement of the export's single beacon was similar to High Speed.

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F-14 schematic showing relay, fuse, motor and lamp circuitry. My domestic Millionaire has the same four-pin connector except pins 3 and 4 are reversed and my control wire is brn/red corresponding to function 10.

Next I went shopping. I mostly used High Speed as my guide. The reflector is a reproduction part from someone called Tilted Pinball which may be listed on Pinside and/or eBay. The rest of the components were had from Marco under the High Speed or Millionaire categories.

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Gathering supplies.

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Connector parts.

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Connector and wiring.

F-14 pictures show a C-11232-1 relay board. I couldn't find a C-11232-1 or a C-11232 or a C-11232-2. So I bought a Great Lakes Modular relay snubber board and removed all the snubber components.

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Original relay board schematic.

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Great Lakes Modular relay snubber board.

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Snubber components removed.

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Circuit board mounting standoffs.

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Wiring, relay board and fuse holder installed using the five pre-punched holes between the sound board and power supply board.

The triple dome/lamp arrangement of F-14 calls for a 4 amp slow-blow fuse. The single dome/lamp arrangement of High Speed calls for a 1 amp slow-blow fuse. My actual current measurements were about 1 amp for the 1683 lamp and about .2 amps for the motor. But so far the 1 amp slow-blow fuse has held.

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1 amp slow-blow fuse.

Technically I should have mounted the beacon mechanism directly into the backbox like High Speed. But I really had no interest in cutting a hole through the top of my backbox. Plus I may have had to relocate the backbox lock. So I made a housing from ¾" plywood. I used a router to round the corners and make a shallow recess for the dome. I worked it over with spot putty and primer and then sprayed it with some hardware store navy blue. The color match was pretty close.

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Inside the beacon mechanism housing.

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Beacon mechanism with 1683 lamp installed.

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Beacon dome in place.

Export Millionaires appear to have an offset backbox lock. My lock is centered and was in the way. So I mounted the beacon housing to the backbox with a pair of small hinges such that I can lift the housing to get at the key.

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Housing mounted to the backbox.

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Backbox key access.

I bought a clear beacon dome based on pictures shown on IPDB. The dome has an insert with a pattern of what looks like yellow Mercury dimes on a black background. I don't know what sort of material the original art was printed on. Paper? Decal? Transparency? I also don't know what an ancient dime has to do with being a 1980s millionaire. But that's what I set out to reproduce. Photo editing isn't my thing, but I gave it a shot starting with a picture I found on IPDB. I found only one coin that wasn't at least partially obscured. I squashed the original picture to try and make the coin look a little more round. Then I chopped it out and pasted a bunch of copies on a black background. The full image is below and should be printed to a width of 17". When it's up on top of the game and 4' from the eye, it doesn't look entirely terrible.

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Beacon art. Click picture for full size image and print to a width of 17".

I took the image to Staples and had it printed on regular 11" x 17" copy paper. The beacon dome has a slight conical shape so I trimmed the top of my image to a shallow arc. I braced the ends of a flexible piece of metal (a yard stick would work too) between two screws, pushed the middle into the image and cut and an arc with a razor blade. Next I put the paper in the dome and taped the ends together. The bottom edge was trimmed in place with a razor.

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Image printed on 11" x 17" copy paper.

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Cutting an arc across the top edge of the image.

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Paper in place and ready to trim the bottom edge.

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Finished.

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Finished.

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--EXTERNAL LINK-- Click image to view a brief YouTube video of the finished beacon.

Beacon Update 09/19/18: A few months ago someone sent me a scan of the original beacon art. I touched up a few scratches and dust marks. My edited 300 dpi image can be had by chicking this link. As before I took the file to Staples and had it printed on regular 11" x 17" copy paper. I trimmed the top and right sides of my print. I left a tab along left side to provide some overlap when taping the ends together. The taped seam goes toward the back of the dome and is unseen. I left a margin along the bottom edge for final trimming with a razor blade after the print was installed in the dome. My dome was slightly taller than the print so I used a black Sharpie to add a line along the bottom edge. You might want to experiment with printing the image at slightly more than 100%. But the back line is not visible from any normal viewing angle.

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Beacon art print cut and ready to install.

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Print installed.

I like this new image better than my old homemade image because the new image is more authentic. But also because the yellow is more pale and the image has less black. It all lets more light shine through. The person who emailed me the original beacon art scan indicated that the art was printed on a transparency or translite type material. I haven't yet figured out how to do that.

03/11/17: Drop target opto interrupter board repair. My first or lower drop target was no longer registering. I didn't find much of any information on the target's C-11319 opto interrupter circuit board so I was on my own for troubleshooting. I didn't have an IR sensor card and my digital camera didn't pick up any IR emissions one way or another. Here's what I did...

First I doodled my own schematic since I couldn't find one.

I measured about 1 volt across the transmitter. That seemed like an okay value.

I measured about 1 volt across the receiver while open to the transmitter. That value seemed okay.

I measured about 12 volts across the receiver when blocked. That value seemed okay.

Next I shorted the column terminal C to the banded side of diode D1 which triggered a switch edge. That seemed encouraging.

That eliminated about everything but the transistor Q1. I tested the transistor and it looked to have an open emitter.

A closer look at the board shows that the transistor Q1 had already been replaced once before. So now I'm waiting for an order of transistors. I also ordered some extra opto interrupters. I also ordered some extra E-clip board retainers because they're easily lost (like I lost the one for this board).

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My C-11319 opto interrupter board schematic.

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Component side of the C-11319 opto interrupter board.

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Solder side of the C-11319. Note that Q1 is not original.

A new 2N3906 did the trick. There's supposed to be a blob of silicone between the board and transistor to help protect the transistor from board vibration. The previous repair person did not replace the silicone and the old transistor emitter lead broke. I added a small dab of silicone. I wanted some level of protection without making the new transistor impossible to replace in the future.

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A new 2N3906 with a small dab of silicone.

Notes on history and compatibility... Millionaire may have been the first game to replace drop target switches with opto interrupters and, accordingly, the first game with the C-11319 opto interrupter board. This board appears to have been quickly superseded by the C-11903-R which is physically longer and has a connector, but may be backwards compatible with the C-11319. As of 2017 the C-11319 does not appear to have been reproduced. However, Great Lakes Modular does make a replacement for the C-11903-R.

03/17/17: The left eject hole mechanism had become a bit wobbly because the pivot pin broke loose from the mounting bracket. I couldn't find an A-6950-R, but I used an A-8268 which appears to be the same thing.

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Pivot pin broke loose from the mounting bracket (green arrow).

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Replacement part A-8268.

09/08/17: I replaced both lower flippers after the right bat cracked at the shaft and broke free from the shaft. I stuck with yellow because I like how the color goes with the rest of the playfield. The flyer shows white.

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New lower flipper bats.

05/12/18: New playfield glass.

09/20/18: Reproduced a plastic. The little blue plastic in front of the middle jet bumper broke. It was already broke and glued to another fragment of scrap plastic. I traced the original piece and sketched what was missing. Using spray adhesive, I glued my pattern to a piece of 1⁄8" Lexan (polycarbonate). I cut it out on a scroll saw and smoothed the edges with fine sandpaper. After confirming I had the right shape and fit, I peeled away the protective film on each side of the part and lightly flame polished the edges. I paid special attention to the front edge of the part which faces the player. I tried to make the edge as straight and smooth and transparent as possible. This is a small detail part that will look best if it doesn't draw attention to itself.

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Tracing/sketching a pattern.

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Test fit.

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Finished Lexan part.

Next I scanned the original plastic to hopefully get a reasonable color match. This was the easiest photo edit ever. It's a part number and a blob of blue. I flipped the image since I was going to use water side decal material.

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Test print.

I made the plastic using water slide decal material. I bought packages of both clear and white sheets for this project. I made sure to buy material that was compatible with my inkjet printer. The clear and white sheets look the same before use. So keep the packaging and don't mix things up. I used a Sharpie to write a small "W" on the white sheet I was using. The image is printed on the clear material. Use the best printer settings. The decal goes on the underside of the Lexan part with the adhesive side up. This is why a mirror image is necessary. This is why clear decal material is necessary. The image will be viewed through the decal. Moreover, the image will be viewed through the adhesion interface between the decal and the Lexan. Any imperfections in the decal application process will be glaringly obvious. If you've never done this, make extra parts and practice.

After printing the image and allowing the ink to dry for a few minutes, I sprayed the image with four light to medium coats of clear acrylic. The first coats should be the lightest. I used Krylon Crystal Clear. The acrylic seals the ink so it won't run when the decal is applied. The acrylic also seemed to strengthen the decal. So I sprayed the white material as well even though there's no printing on the white.

The next day I cut out the decal and applied it to the Lexan part as per instructions. I traced around the Lexan part and tried to cut the decal as close as possible to its final shape. I found it easier to line up a cut edge of the decal with a transparent edge of the Lexan. That is, cutting the decal oversized doesn't help. If there is any excess decal material, it can be trimmed with a razor when dry. Think about how the decal and Lexan are oriented. Remember that it's all going together upside down.

Here's the critical step. The decal must be applied as perfectly as possible. As the decal was soaking for a minute in warm water I applied a decal setting solution to the Lexan. I placed the decal on the Lexan, lined it up and then carefully worked on blotting up excess water and working out any bubbles. Apparently there's some sort of squeegee available for just this purpose. Instead I used a small soft-bristle paint brush. The trick is to work the decal down flat, but don't work it to the point of destroying the decal. Then walk away. The next day I applied the white decal layer in a similar manner.

The white backing has several purposes. It helps protect the printing on the clear decal. It fills in any areas of the clear decal that were supposed to be white. Printers don't print white. And the white brings out the colors printed on the clear decal. By itself the clear decal looks terrible. So you have to finish the whole process before you know if you've made something that looks good. Note that if you're making a plastic with transparent areas, you'd have to pre-cut the white decal accordingly. That wasn't the case with the part I made here.

The top part in the picture below is the new plastic made by the water slide decal method described here. The middle part is the original plastic. The bottom part is another plastic I made using the photo paper method. See my Bad Cats repair page for info on the photo paper method. The adhesion process gives the photo paper part an undesirable cloudy/matte appearance that doesn't quite look right. The water slide decal method looks better, but is much more tedious to produce. The water side method also produces a more translucent part which will look better if the part is backlit. That wasn't really an issue here since this particular plastic is not backlit.

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A comparison of parts.

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Done.